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Rotando

 

Rotando is a unique right hand guitar technique, a mixture between rasgueado and constant rotating movement of the wrist. David has been developing this technique since 2011 and he is using it in most of his guitar compositions. For example in Tormenta, Corazón Abierto or Sunrise.
The reason David chose to name it Rotando is because of the rotating movement. David would rotate his forehand while controlling the movements of i, m, a fingers separately, creating a large, ringing, orchestral sound.
Whereas rascado or tremolo are techniques used mainly as an accompaniment to a main melody, Rotando serves both as an accompaniment and melody leader at the same time.
Melody can be created by m/a finger on melodic strings, or by the i finger on bass strings. While the rest of the fingers always accompany the melody.

On the 21st of October 2017, John Ligtenberg, prominent Dutch painter and coincidentally also an author and propagator of a unique painting technique has surprised David during a special concert event when he uncovered his new picture called Rotando.

This is probably the first time in guitar music history that a technique or method of playing specific to one performer had its own painting.